PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Members of The Alliance have offered trainings and workshops on the topic of psychological maltreatment to a wide range of legal and mental health professionals including child protection workers, social workers, psychiatrists, child welfare administrators, attorneys for the minor child, among others. Members are available to provide future trainings. 

Child Psychological Maltreatment Education and Training Resources

Child Psychological Maltreatment 101 (CPM-101), a 58 minute video covering essentials of the knowledge base: To watch video click here and to download video click here

CPM-101 Quiz: click here

APSAC Guidelines for the Determination of Suspected Psychological Maltreatment of Children and Youth: click here

Psychological Maltreatment Definition and Forms Table: click here

APSAC Monograph on Psychological Maltreatment: click here

CPM-101 References: click here

DRAFT Modules on CPM Related Topics

·      Racism, Prejudice, Implicit Bias and Psychological Maltreatment: Orientation, Guidelines and Resources for Trainers (Marva Lewis, Charles Edwards & Kimberley Easton) (this link will download the program to your computer, which then can be accessed by opening the download): click here 

·      CPM-TOT Child Participation and Agency Module (Lauren Marie Hall):

      ·      To view the videos, click here

      ·      For resources, click here

·      Report on Proposed National Definitions and Standards for Child Psychological Maltreatment (Amy Slep, Danya Glaser, Jody Todd Manly): click here

DECEMBER 2019 APSAC ADVISOR EDITION (Volume 31, No 3) ON PSYCHOLOGICAL MALTREATMENT This edition of the APSAC ADVISOR on Child Psychological Maltreatment is provided here with the permission of APSAC.  It is not for duplication and dissemination: click here 

UPCOMING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Indiana Child Psychological Maltreatment Training of Trainers – Virtual (CPM-TOT)
May 11-12, 2021
The Child Psychological Maltreatment Training of Trainers (CPM-TOT) program will prepare selected members of Indiana’s major social systems, community sectors and professions to be the leaders capable of providing and/or overseeing related consultation and education/training in their sectors of influence. The Child Psychological Maltreatment Summit (Indianapolis, October 27-29 of  2019) provided the impetus for the CPM-TOT.  At the Summit, international, national and Indiana experts formulated the path forward to reduce and eliminate child psychological maltreatment and promote child safety, resiliency and well-being.  Toward these goals, they strongly recommended education and training for influential persons and systems. The CPM-TOT will provide breadth and depth of education regarding the nature of psychological maltreatment and intervention (i.e., prevention and correction) strategies applicable within and across general, at-risk and maltreated populations and social systems/services sectors. Particular attention will be devoted to practical planning to bring this knowledge to bear effectively to achieve advances.  Those who participate in the CPM-TOT will be among the most knowledgeable experts in the United States regarding this topic and prepared to provide related education and training in their service sectors. 

Co-Chairs: Stuart N. Hart, PhD., and Marla R. Brassard, PhD.

 


PM Training for Virginia and Texas State Chapters of NASW - Virtual

May 21, 2021; 1-4 PM EDST

Psychological Maltreatment-Cognitive & Emotional Violence to Children: Its Nature and Intervention Psychological maltreatment (i.e., mental injury, emotional/cognitive abuse and neglect) occurs at higher levels of prevalence and produces harm of range, magnitude and duration equal to or exceeding other forms of violence against children. Societal understanding of and interventions for psychological maltreatment are generally far from adequate. This program is formulated for social workers serving the development and mental health needs of children to provide essential knowledge and advance capacities to identify, understand, appreciate, and intervene to prevent risk, occurrence, and reoccurrence of psychological maltreatment and to reduce its harm where it does occur. It will include didactic, interactive, and simulation components.

Presenters: Sirrilla D. Blackmon, LCSW, LCSC; Marla R. Brassard, PhD.; Stuart N. Hart, PhD.
 


Racism and Prejudice as Forms of the Psychological Maltreatment of Children APSAC Virtual Colloquium

July 13, 2021; 5:30 EDST
Racism and other forms of prejudice-based treatment are destructive to the quality of life of both their targets and perpetrators. The American Professional Society on Abuse of Children states, “When directed at youth, racism is child abuse. It is a form of psychological maltreatment and toxic like physical and sexual abuse.” Promising interventions fail to address the psychosocial needs of infants and youth impacted by racism. Comprehensive anti-racist interventions, may 
bring significant social justice and quality of life benefits to all. This symposium explores race- based psychological maltreatment (RPM), at the individual, family, and systems level.  We report the findings of research from a nation-wide study describing the socioemotional correlates of colorism - the acceptance and rejection of infants and young children based on their skin color and hair texture. We introduce the intergenerational developmental concept of building affective capital, as an approach to addressing RPM.  Culturally informed interventions at individual- interpersonal, and social norms/systems levels are proposed, with consideration for their applications across general, at-risk and maltreated populations and synergy across professional disciplines and social service systems. The program will include presentations by subject experts, commentary by APSAC leadership, and response to audience questions.

Presenters/Panel: Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman; PhD; Marva Lewis, PhD;; Viola Von-Eden, PhD.; Stuart N. Hart,
PhD.

Global Child Psychological Maltreatment Summit-Vision, Recommendations Progress APSAC Virtual Conference

July 14, 2021; 4 pm EDST
The global Child Psychological Maltreatment Summit (2019), a Psychological Maltreatment Alliance endorsed event,  convened international, national and state (Indiana) experts to draw on nearly 40 years of evolving research and expert opinion since the International Conference on Psychological Maltreatment (1983) to construct recommendations for further progress in understanding and intervention for psychological maltreatment.  Recommendations for goals and pathways toward them were generated on five critical issues themes:  Definitions, laws and standards; Healthy child development;  Changing social norms for child adversity, resiliency and well-being; Health / public health approach promotion and prevention programs and measures; Interventions for CPM risk, occurrence and harm; Education / training / learning of public and professional sectors; and Child participation and agency.  Highlights will be presented of the nature of the Summit, its recommendations, and the progressive developments extending from those recommendations, including consideration of the relevance of CPM for racism and other forms of prejudice-based mistreatment, advances in harmonized and coordinated multiple tier intervention (i.e., primary prevention, risk reduction, rectification of PM and its harm) across societal sectors; and investment in transformations toward progressively higher levels of promotion of child well-being and resilience relative to continuing but upgraded efforts to reduce risks and combat existing maltreatment.

Panel: Sirrilla D. Blackmon, LCSW, LCSC; Marla R. Brassard; Stuart N. Hart, PhD.; Mel Schneiderman, PhD., Amy Slep, PhD.; Julie Whitman, MSW.

 


American Psychological Association Conference Distance/Recorded

August, 2021
Psychological Maltreatment: Exploring Racism as an Unrecognized Form of Child Abuse The American Professional Society on Abuse of Children has proclaimed that “When directed at youth, racism is child abuse. It is a form of psychological maltreatment and toxic like physical and sexual abuse.” This presentation explores the nature PM embodied in racism, its extension to all forms of prejudicial treatment, and provides guidance for multiple-tier interventions. In particular, (1) racism and other types of prejudicial treatment as expressed in PM forms of spurning, terrorizing, isolating, corrupting/exploiting, and denying emotional responsiveness are clarified; (2) resulting depression and anxiety, suicidality, anti-social behavior, perceptual problems, cognitive deficits, substance misuse, and physical health problems are addressed; and (3) interventions at individual-interpersonal and social systems levels are proposed which promote the obverse of PM, empathy, pro-social skills and social-emotional health development; valid and reliable surveying of status and trends; and structural mechanisms and configurations respecting potential, capacity and contribution. In combination with these topics, consideration will be given to prejudicial treatment’s affront to universal human rights standards, which are essentially psycho-social in nature and respectful of human dignity, and to the possibility of bringing those standards more effectively to bear in support of progress; to educator and child rearing responsibilities and roles shared by human beings across the social ecology; to the maltreatment suffered by children encouraged to develop and express prejudicial bias; and to the opportunities for constructive practices in homes, schools, recreation/sports, faith communities, and employment. Presenters/Panel: Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman, PhD.; Marva Lewis, PhD; Bonnie Nastasi, PhD.; Mel Schneiderman, PhD

 


Hearst Program: Psychological Maltreatment
Wednesday, October 6, 2021
The workshop will focus on the following six points: (1) Why it is important to study and understand psychological maltreatment (PM) (2) What are the major types and forms of PM (3) How common is PM (4) What are the child/caregiver/family risk factors for PM (5) In what ways is PM harmful to children, and (6) How to approach intervention.
Workshop leaders: Amy J. L. Baker, Ph.D. and Roslyn Murov, M.D.

RECENTLY COMPLETED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Prevention of Psychological Maltreatment

Psychological maltreatment/emotional abuse is the least understood and most pervasive form of child maltreatment. This workshop will enable participants to define the term and will describe the FAIR system, an approach to assessment allegations and substantiation determinations that is now in use across the U.S. armed services. Our research has found that this approach to assessment and substantiation results in significant declines in subsequent maltreatment as compared with typical approaches. The implications for child welfare systems and families will be explored. 

Presenter: Amy Slep, Ph.D.; Professor, New York University

Please click on the video below to watch the workshop:

 

 

 

Preventing Abuse and Neglect in Our Lifetime: A Virtual Conference

October 16th, 2020: 10:30am  - 11:30pm

Psychological Maltreatment/emotional abuse is the least understood and most pervasive form of child maltreatment. This workshop will enable participants to define the term and will describe the FAIR system, an approach to assessment allegations and substantiation determinations that is now in use across the U.S. armed services. Our research has found that this approach to assessment and substantiation results in significant declines in subsequent maltreatment as compared with typical approaches. The implications for child welfare systems and families will be explored.                                                                                        

Presenter: Amy Slep, Ph.D. Professor, New York University

Psychological Maltreatment

September 23, 2020

Participants will learn about the history of the concept of psychological maltreatment as well as the five primary forms of psychological maltreatment and the research documenting their negative consequences for children’s development. Examples will be provided of each type of psychological maltreatment in order to provide participants with a complete understanding of the many manifestations this type of child maltreatment can take, relying on the revised definition developed by the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children.

Workshop leaders: Amy J. L. Baker, Ph.D. and Mel Schneiderman, Ph.D.

When Does Poor Parenting Cross Over Into Psychological Maltreatment?

April 29, 2020

Parenting is universally challenging and embedded in a dynamic context where outsiders can miss much of the shared meaning of ongoing interactions. This can make it difficult for even experienced clinicians to decide that particular parenting behaviors have moved from hurtful to abuse or neglect. This webinar a) briefly reviews the research on nonphysical parental behavior that has been shown to be universally harmful to children and youth (psychological maltreatment), b) reviews models that have been proposed and/or widely implemented for determining whether such behavior crosses the line from poor parenting to PM, and c) presents a decision framework for professionals working families. For more information, email us at info@psychologicalmaltreatment.org.

 

Psychological Maltreatment - A Central Issue in Violence Against Children

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

This workshop will present the fundamentals concerning its nature, forms, impact, risk factors, areas of harm and possibilities for intervention. Participants will learn about the six primary forms of psychological maltreatment and the research documenting their negative consequences for children’s development. Examples will be provided of each type of psychological maltreatment in order to provide participants with an in-depth understanding of the many manifestations this type of child maltreatment can take. For more information, click here for the flyer or email us at info@psychologicalmaltreatment.org.

Train-the-Trainers

February 27-28, 2020

The Alliance developed a curricula to equip professionals with the skills to identify, intervene and prevent psychological maltreatment. To ensure the widest possible distribution of this resource, The Alliance developed a 2-day Train-the-Trainer program to provide child and family serving agencies with a curriculum and the skills to present the curriculum. The goal is to create a cadre of trainers who can deliver The Alliance's training module throughout their agency, community and/or state. For more information about the Train-the-Trainer program, click here for the flyer or email us at info@psychologicalmaltreatment.org.

 

William Randolph Hearst Program

November 13, 2019

Participants were provided information about the six primary forms of psychological maltreatment and the research documenting their negative consequences for children’s development. Examples were provided of each type of psychological maltreatment in order to provide participants with a complete understanding of the many manifestations this type of child maltreatment can take, relying on the revised definition developed by the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children.

Psychological Maltreatment Summit

October 27-29, 2019

The Child Psychological Maltreatment Summit embodied a 2.5 day think-tank, deliberative working program of international, national, and Indiana experts on psychological maltreatment as well as child protection, health, development, education, resiliency, and well-being. It was only the second international program on the topic, following the 1983 International Conference on the Psychological Abuse of Children and Youth (both held in Indianapolis and sponsored by Lilly Endowment). The Summit was an initiative of the Psychological Maltreatment Alliance with the Haruv Institute and the National Foundation to end Child Abuse and Neglect as partners.  The intent of the summit was to produce an agenda applicable at international, national and state levels to identify, generate, and recommend priorities and provide guidance to achieve needed advances in research, law, policy, and practices to reduce/eliminate child psychological maltreatment in ways which will simultaneously promote well-being. Indiana involvement was included to assure the benefits of perspectives from experts with directly-related responsibilities and opportunities for creating and implementing models, policies, programs, and practices that would test and realize the agenda. 

 

Psychological Maltreatment - A Central Issue in Violence Against Children

February 13, 2019

This webinar presented Psychological Maltreatment fundamentals concerning its nature, forms, impact and possibilities for intervention. Participants were provided with information about the history of the concept of psychological maltreatment as well as the six primary forms of psychological maltreatment and the research documenting their negative consequences for children’s development. Examples were provided of each type of psychological maltreatment in order to provide participants with a complete understanding of the many manifestations this type of child maltreatment can take. Attention was given to the questions, comments and interests of participants and opportunities were offered to inform and cooperate in future developments.